Monthly Archives: June 2016

A Short Narrative

While in the saddle, if you ‘stay in the middle with your legs on both sides’, you can usually make it safely through anything that happens. A good horseman uses balance and mindfulness, not muscle.

In some ways, handling a horse from the ground is more dangerous than being in the saddle. When you’re working with animals on the ground it’s like ‘dancing’ with a thousand-pound unpredictable animal – with very hard feet.

Even if you’ve been around horses all your life or perhaps especially if you’ve been around them all your life, you know how unpredictable they can be, given the right circumstances. And still, because you’ve been around them a long time, you become lax in your handling of them. It works out fine, most of the time.

Even the animals that seem mean to us humans, never start the day thinking, “I’m gonna get him today.” Many new horse owners are clueless about an animal’s nature or its natural ability to hurt you without trying to – and if someone is hurt, they blame the horse, ‘oh that’s a baaaaad horse!’.

So many animal owners seem to have been raised in a Disney movie, where all the animals sing and just love ‘people’ and will save ‘people’ from danger.

Animals start off pretty neutral. It’s how humans interact with them that makes them seem a certain way. One of the basic horsemanship rules is ‘don’t ever stand directly in front of a horse’ and newbie dudes often follow that rule better than the old hands.

Allowing a horse to man-handle a human even in a way that seems affectionate or harmless can lead to problems. Horses don’t rub on people because they like them. They do it because they itch and they’re just using their human for a scratching post. Horses should respect their humans more than that. Given the right circumstances, not respecting their humans space could result in the injury of the human or even the horse.

Allowing a horse to be too close or too ‘familiar’ can result in the animal thinking he can be too close at other times and even try to dominate their human as though they were another horse. If they are too close and they are spooked by something for example, they horse could just run over the human to get away. Horses bang and bump on each other all the time in a herd without injuries. If your horse bangs against you, you will likely be hurt. The horse must never think you are part of his or her herd.

In the story, Quirt and Brody, Brody lets his horse, Archer get away with breaking the rules sometimes, but the teenager is athletic and most of the time, can get out of the way. He and Archer also have an unusual understanding between them, and even the horse seems to know when it’s important to respect Brody’s space. Not everyone is as athletic or strong as Brody is, and not all horses are as well mannered as Archer is.

If rules are broken, sometimes . . . there is no place to go to get out of the way.

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My Orange Computer Build

orangecomputerbuild (1) orangecomputerbuild (2)orangecomputerbuild (3) Here are photos from where I was building my first computer [almost unassisted] I had a lot of help when I put together my first one, less on the second one and on this one the techs at work didn’t have to answer but a couple of questions ^-^))

PowerColor PCS+ Radeon R9 380 DirectX 12 AXR9 380 4GBD5-PPDHE 4GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support ATX Video Card

120GB SSD
1TB HDD Storage

ASUS Sabertooth Motherboard

32 GB Ram

It has 5 Orange LED fans, but I’m thinking of going to a water-cooled system because it overheated once. {that was the last time I had it on.}

Sever the Ties of Hope and Fear

“To cut through the mind’s clinging, it is important to understand that all appearances are void, like the appearance of water in a mirage. Beautiful forms are of no benefit to the mind, nor can ugly forms harm it in any way. Sever the ties of hope and fear, attraction and repulsion, and remain in equanimity in the understanding that all phenomena are nothing more than projections of your own mind.”
~ Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche

No Righteous Anger

“When somebody is doing actions you don’t like, the spiritual solution is to do what you can to stop them, but you do it in such a way that you do not reject the person. You reject the action, but not the person. That is a big one. You reject the action, but not the person….
I can disagree with a political leader’s actions. I can legislate. I can do civil disobedience if I think what he supports is wrong. I can disagree with actions that are not compassionate. But I want to keep my heart open. If I don’t, I am part of the problem, not part of the solution. And that’s just not interesting enough. That’s what the inner work is—to become part of the solution.
So going around being angry at everything and everybody is a cheap pie. It really is. You don’t have to act out of anger in order to oppose something. You can act to oppose something because it creates suffering. You can become an instrument of that which relieves suffering, but you don’t have to get angry about it.
Social action does not have to be pumped up by righteous indignation or anger. That’s working with the dark forces. That’s working with fear. You can work with love. You can oppose somebody out of love. You can do social action out of love. And that’s the way you win the whole war, not just the battle.”
~Ram Dass.

Let Go

“Let go of what has passed.
Let go of what may come.
Let go of what is happening now.
Don’t try to figure anything out.
Don’t try to make anything happen.

Relax, right now, and rest.”
~Tilopa